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TUANIS CHOCOLATE


Organic Costa Rican Talamanca Cacao

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TUANIS CHOCOLATE


Organic Costa Rican Talamanca Cacao

 

Quality from the source

"There is absolutely no substitute for the best. Good food cannot be made of inferior ingredients masked with high flavor. It is true thrift to use the best ingredients available and to waste nothing."      - James Beard

 
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The finest cacao in the world


We buy directly from Costa Rican farmers

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The finest cacao in the world


We buy directly from Costa Rican farmers

Order Now

Tuanis® Chocolate is dedicated to providing you access to the finest chocolate in the world, sourced directly from Costa Rican farmers in the southeastern Talamanca region, who are paid superior wages to encourage and promote sustainability and growth of their farms and families.  The native peoples of this area are known as the Bribri.  Cacao, as in most of the indigenous groups in southern Costa Rica and northern Panama, has a special significance in Bribri culture. For them the cacao tree used to be a woman and Sibu (God) turned into a tree. Cacao branches are never used as firewood and only women are allowed to prepare and serve the sacred drink. Cacao is used in special occasions, ceremonies and in certain rites of passage. Currently there exists several Bribri women's associations that produce organic, hand made chocolate that helps them in their livelihoods. 

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Giving Back to the Community


Your purchase helps us donate to schools like Escuela Soki and encourage economic growth for the village of Bribri

Giving Back to the Community


Your purchase helps us donate to schools like Escuela Soki and encourage economic growth for the village of Bribri

The Bribri were the autochthonous people of the Talamanca region, living in the mountains and Caribbean coastal areas of Costa Rica and northern Panama. The majority live without running water and a scarce amount of electricity, raising cacao, banano, and platano to sell as well as beans, rice, corn, and a variety of produce for their own consumption. Many Bribri are isolated and have their own language. This has allowed them to maintain their indigenous culture, although it has also resulted in less access to education and health care. Although the group has the lowest income per capita in the country, they are able to raise much of their own produce, medicine, and housing materials, and earn cash to purchase what they can't grow themselves through tourism and by selling cacao, banana, and platano.